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Bicycling

Since the first paved pathways were completed in Jackson Hole in 1996, the valley has become a cyclist’s paradise. Almost 60 miles of paved pathways thread through Jackson Hole, with more in the works. Those on two wheels can access Grand Teton on a path that begins at the north end of town and travels 21 miles to South Jenny Lake Junction. A bike lane permits two-way bike traffic along the one-way Jenny Lake Loop Road, a one-hour ride. The River Road, 4 miles north of Moose, is an easy four-hour mountain-bike ride along a ridge above the Snake River on a gravel road. Bicycles are not allowed on trails or in the backcountry in the park.

On the Bridger-Teton National Forest that surrounds Jackson, the Snow King Mountain trail system offers miles of singletrack, from easy to challenging. The Cache Creek to Game Creek loop is a 25-mile ride on dirt roads, trails, and a paved pathway. Roadies can enjoy the rural Fish Creek or Fall Creek roads, and downhillers revel in the Bike Park at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. Maps can be obtained at the Jackson Hole and Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center at the north end of town on Cache Street.

Outfitters

Hoback Sports. Get your own bike tuned up or rent one: road, mountain, hybrid, kids, and trailers. The shop also sells bikes, clothing, and accessories, and offers daily mountain bike tours. 520 W. Broadway, #3, Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–5335. www.hobacksports.com. Daily 10–6.

Teton Mountain Bike Tours. Mountain bikers of all skill levels can take guided half-, full-, or multiday tours with Teton Mountain Bike Tours into both Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks, as well as winter tours of Jackson Hole on snow bikes with fat, studded tires. The store has rentals and is right across from the pathway leading to Grand Teton. 545 N. Cache St., Jackson, WY, 83002. 307/733–0712 or 800/733–0788. www.tetonmtbike.com. Half- to full-day trips $65–$110, 4-day Teton/Yellowstone tour $1,995. May–Sept.

Bird-Watching

With more than 300 species of birds in the park, the Tetons make excellent bird-watching country. Here you might spot both the calliope hummingbird (the smallest North American hummingbird) and the trumpeter swan (the world's largest waterfowl). The two riparian habitats described here draw lots of attention, but there are many other bird-busy areas as well. Birds of prey circle around Antelope Flats Road, for instance—the surrounding fields are good hunting turf for red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. At Taggart Lake you might see woodpeckers, bluebirds, and hummingbirds. Look for songbirds, such as pine and evening grosbeaks and Cassin's finches, in surrounding open pine and aspen forests.

Oxbow Bend. Some seriously impressive birds congregate at this quiet spot. In spring, white pelicans stop by during their northerly migration; in summer, bald eagles, great blue herons, and osprey nest nearby. Year-round, you'll have a good chance of seeing trumpeter swans. Nearby Willow Flats has similar bird life, plus sandhill cranes. U.S. 89/191/287, 2 miles east of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013.

Phelps Lake. The moderate, 1.8-mile round-trip Phelps Lake Overlook Trail takes you from the Death Canyon trailhead up conifer- and aspen-lined glacial moraine to a view that's accessible only by foot. Expect abundant bird life: Western tanagers, northern flickers, and ruby-crowned kinglets thrive in the bordering woods, and hummingbirds feed on scarlet gilia beneath the overlook. Don't neglect the Phelps Lake Trail, which circles the lake and is accessible from either Death Canyon or the Rockefeller Preserve. Moose-Wilson Rd., about 3 miles off Teton Park Rd., Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Boating and Water Sports

Water sports in Grand Teton are diverse. You can float the Snake River, which runs high and fast early in the season (May and June) and more slowly during the latter part of the summer. Canoes, kayaks, and stand-up paddleboards dominate the smaller lakes and share the water with motorboats on impressively large Jackson Lake. Motorboats also are allowed on Jenny Lake, but there's an engine limit of 10 horsepower. You can launch your boat at Colter Bay, Leek's Marina, Signal Mountain, and Spalding Bay on Jackson Lake.

If you're floating the Snake River on your own, you are required to purchase a permit ($20 per boat for the entire season, or $10 per raft for seven days). Permits are available year-round at Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center and in summer at Colter Bay. Before you set out, check with park rangers for current conditions.

You may prefer to take one of the many guided float trips through calm-water sections of the Snake; outfitters pick you up at the float-trip parking area near Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center for a 15-minute drive to upriver launch sites. Ponchos and life preservers are provided. Early morning and evening floats are your best bets for wildlife viewing, but be sure to carry a jacket or sweater. Float season runs mid-April to December 15.

Colter Bay Marina. All types of services are available to boaters, including free parking for boat trailers and vehicles, free mooring, guided fishing trips, boat rentals, and fuel. On Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–3100 or 800/628–9988.

Leek's Marina. Parking for boat trailers and other vehicles is available for up to three nights. There are no boat rentals, but you can get fuel, and there's free short-term docking plus a superb pizza restaurant. This marina is operated by park concessionaire Signal Mountain Lodge. U.S. 89/191/287, 6 miles north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–2831. Mid-May–late Sept.

Signal Mountain Lodge Marina. The marina rents pontoon boats, deck cruisers, motorboats, kayaks, and canoes by the hour or all day; rates start at $16 an hour for a kayak to $117 an hour for a deck cruiser. Teton Park Rd., 3 miles south of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–2831. Mid-May–late Sept.

Tours and Outfitters

Barker-Ewing Float Trips. Travel the peaceful parts of the Snake River looking for wildlife as knowledgeable guides talk about area history, plants, and animals. Moose, WY, 83012. 307/733–1800 or 800/365–1800. www.barkerewing.com. $70. May–Sept.

Grand Teton Lodge Company. Rent motorboats, kayaks, and canoes at Colter Bay from Grand Teton Lodge Company. The company also offers scenic raft trips on the Snake River. 2 miles off U.S. 89/191/287, 5 miles north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–3100 or 800/628–9988. www.gtlc.com. Kayaks and canoes $17 per hr, motorboats $40 per hr. Late May–late Sept.

Lewis & Clark River Expeditions. Get in touch with this outfitter for an exhilarating wet-and-wild ride or a more leisurely scenic float. Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–4022 or 800/824–5375. www.lewisandclarkriverrafting.com. $55–$109. Mid-May–mid-Sept.

Mad River Boat Trips. Mad River leads a variety of white-water and scenic float trips, some combined with breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–6203 or 800/458–7238. www.mad-river.com. $72–$124. Mid-May–Sept.

Rendezvous River Sports. Join the stand-up paddleboard craze with help from the river rats at Rendezvous. Kayaking instruction and guided trips on area rivers and lakes are also available. The shop rents kayaks, canoes, rafts, and paddleboards. Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–2471. www.jacksonholekayak.com. Half-day clinic $110–$250, full-day $145–$340. Apr.–Oct.

Triangle X National Park Float Trips. Knowlegeable and charismatic guides row you down 10 miles of the Snake River through pristine riparian habitat in Grand Teton National Park. Try dawn or sunset supper floats for best wildlife viewing. Moose, WY, 83012. 307/733–5500 or 888/860–0005. nationalparkfloattrips.com. $70. Mid-May–Sept.

Climbing

The Teton Range has some of the nation's most diverse mountaineering. Excellent rock, snow, and ice routes abound. Unless you're already a pro, it's recommended that you take a course from one of the park’s concessionaire climbing schools before tackling the tough terrain. Practice your moves at Teton Boulder Park, a free outdoor artificial climbing wall in Phil Baux Park at the base of Snow King Mountain.

Tours

Exum Mountain Guides. The oldest guide service in North America leads a variety of climbing experiences, including one-day mountain climbs, weeklong clinics culminating with a two-day ascent of the Grand Teton, and backcountry adventures on skis and snowboards. Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012. 307/733–2297. www.exumguides.com. One-day climbs $255–$395.

Jackson Hole Mountain Guides. Beginning to advanced climbers can get instruction or explore classic granite routes in the Tetons and beyond. 1325 S. Hwy. 89, Suite 104, Jackson, WY, 83002. 307/733–4979 or 800/239–7642. www.jhmg.com. Basic group class $160; one-day guided climbs $295–$500.

Fishing

Rainbow, brook, lake, and native cutthroat trout inhabit the park's waters. The Snake's 75 miles of river and tributary are world-renowned for their fishing. To fish in Grand Teton National Park, you need a Wyoming fishing license. A day permit for nonresidents is $14, and an annual permit is $92 plus a $12.50 conservation stamp; for state residents a license costs $24 per season plus $12.50 for a conservation stamp. Children under age 14 can fish free with an adult who has a license.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Buy a fishing license at Colter Bay Marina, Dornan's, Signal Mountain Lodge, and at area sporting-goods stores, where you also can get solid information on good fishing spots and the best flies or lures to use. Or get one directly from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. 420 N. Cache St., Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–2321. gf.state.wy.us.

Tours

Grand Teton Lodge Company. The park's major concessionaire, Grand Teton Lodge Company, operates guided fishing trips on Jackson Lake and guided fly-fishing trips on the Snake River. Make reservations at the activities desks at Colter Bay Village or Jackson Lake Lodge, where trips originate. Colter Bay Marina or Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–3100 or 800/628–9988. www.gtlc.com. $176–$525. June–Sept.

Signal Mountain Lodge. Half-day Jackson Lake guided fishing trips depart from the marina at Signal Mountain Lodge. Equipment and tackle are included in the price. Teton Park Rd., 3 miles south of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–2831. www.signalmountainlodge.com. $280. Mid-May–late Sept.

Hiking

Most of Grand Teton's trails are unpaved, with just a few short paved sections in the vicinity of developed areas. You can get trail maps and information about hiking conditions from rangers at the park visitor centers at Moose, Jenny Lake, or Colter Bay, where you will also find bathrooms or outhouses; there are no facilities along trails themselves. Of the more than 250 miles of maintained trails, the most popular are those around Jenny Lake, the Leigh and String lakes area, and Taggart Lake Trail, with views of Avalanche Canyon.

Frontcountry or backcountry you may see moose and bears—keep your distance. Pets are not permitted on trails or in the backcountry, but you can take them along roadsides as long as they are on a leash no more than 6 feet long. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return, and carry plenty of water, snacks, rain gear, warm clothes, bear spray, and a cell phone.

Easy

Cascade Canyon Trail. Take the 20-minute boat ride ($12) from the Jenny Lake dock to the start of a gentle, ½-mile climb to 200-foot Hidden Falls, the park's most popular and crowded trail destination. With the boat ride, plan on a couple of hours to experience this trail. Listen here for the distinctive bleating of the rabbitlike pikas among the glacial boulders and pines. The trail continues ½ mile to Inspiration Point over a rocky path that is moderately steep. There are two points on the climb that afford good views of Jenny Lake and the surrounding area, but keep climbing; after passing a rock wall you'll finally reach the true Inspiration Point, with the best views. Easy. Access trailhead from Jenny Lake Visitor Center, 1/4 mile off Teton Park Rd., 8 miles north of Moose Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Colter Bay Nature Trail Loop. This very easy, 1¾-mile round-trip excursion treats you to views of Jackson Lake and the Tetons. As you follow the level trail from Colter Bay Visitor Center and along the forest's edge, you may see moose and bald eagles. Allow yourself two hours to complete the walk. Easy. Trailhead at Colter Bay Visitor Center, 1 mile off U.S. 89/191/287, 5 miles north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013.

Lunchtree Hill Trail. One of the park's easiest trails begins at Jackson Lake Lodge and leads ½ mile to the top of a hill above Willow Flats. The area's willow thickets, beaver ponds, and wet, grassy meadows make it a birder's paradise. Look for sandhill cranes, hummingbirds, and the many types of songbirds described in the free bird guide available at visitor centers. You might also see moose. The round-trip walk takes no more than half an hour. Easy. Trailhead at Jackson Lake Lodge, U.S. 89/191/287, ½ mile north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013.

Moderate

Jenny Lake Trail. You can walk to Hidden Falls from Jenny Lake ranger station by following the mostly level trail around the south shore of the lake to Cascade Canyon Trail. Jenny Lake Trail continues around the lake for 6½ miles. It's an easy trail—classed here as moderate because of its length—that will take you two to three hours. You'll walk through a lodgepole-pine forest, have expansive views of the lake and the land to the east, and hug the shoulder of the massive Teton range itself. Along the way you are likely to see elk, pikas, golden-mantled ground squirrels, a variety of ducks and water birds, plus you may hear elk bugling, birdsong, and the chatter of squirrels. Moderate. Trailhead at Jenny Lake Visitor Center, S. Jenny Lake Junction, ½ mile off Teton Park Rd., 8 miles north of Moose Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Leigh Lake Trail. The flat trail follows String Lake's northeastern shore to Leigh Lake's south shore, covering 2 miles in a round-trip of about an hour. You can extend your hike into a moderate 7½-mile, four-hour round-trip by following the forested east shore of Leigh Lake to Bearpaw Lake. Along the way you'll have views of Mt. Moran across the lake, and you may be lucky enough to spot a moose or bear. Moderate. Leigh Lake Trailhead, northwest corner of String Lake Picnic Area, ½ mile west of Jenny Lake Rd., 2 miles off Teton Park Rd., 12 miles north of Moose Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

String Lake Trail. This 3½-mile loop around String Lake lies in the shadows of 11,144-foot Rockchuck Peak and 11,430-foot Mt. Saint John. This is also a good place to see moose, hear songbirds, and view wildflowers. This trail, which takes about three hours, is a bit more difficult than other mid-length trails in the park, which means it is also less crowded. Moderate. String Lake Trailhead, ¼ mile west of Jenny Lake Rd., 2 miles off Teton Park Rd., 12 miles north of Moose Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Taggart Lake Trail. Hike 1½ miles from the trailhead to the lake and then continue on a 4-mile route around the lake where the terrain becomes steeper near Beaver Creek. There are views of Avalanche Canyon and areas where you might see moose. Plan on two to three hours to enjoy this trail. Moderate. Taggart Lake Trailhead, 4 miles south of S. Jenny Lake Junction on Teton Park Rd., Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Difficult

Death Canyon Trail. This 7.6-mile trail to the junction with Static Peak Trail is strenuous, with lots of hills to traverse before the final 1,061-foot climb up into Death Canyon. Plan to spend most of the day on this steep trail. Difficult. Death Canyon Trailhead, off Moose-Wilson Rd., 4 miles south of Moose Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83012.

Tours

Hole Hiking Experience. Guides lead hikes for all ages and ability levels in Grand Teton National Park and forests beyond. They provide information about the history, geology, and ecology of the area. Many trips incorporate yoga or have a holistic bent. In winter, snowshoe tours are offered. Jackson, WY, 83002. 307/690–4453 or 866/733–4453. www.holehike.com.

Horseback Riding

You can arrange a guided horseback tour at Colter Bay Village and Jackson Lake Lodge corrals or with a number of private outfitters. Most offer rides of an hour or two up to all-day excursions. If you want to spend even more time riding in Grand Teton and the surrounding mountains, consider a stay at a dude ranch. Shorter rides are almost all appropriate for novice riders, while more experienced cowboys and cowgirls will enjoy the longer journeys where the terrain gets steeper and you may wind through deep forests. For any ride be sure to wear long pants and boots (cowboy boots or hiking boots). Because you may ride through trees, a long-sleeve shirt is also a good idea and a hat is always appropriate, but it should have a stampede string to make sure it stays on your head if the wind comes up.

Tours

Colter Bay Village Corral. One- and two-hour rides leave Colter Bay Village Corral for a variety of destinations. Short jaunts head around several secluded ponds on Hermitage Point. 2 miles off U.S. 89/191/287, 5 miles north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–3100 or 800/628–9988. www.gtlc.com. $40–$60. June–Sept.

Jackson Lake Lodge Corral. Two-hour trail rides follow secluded paths to peaceful Emma Matilda Lake and Oxbow Bend. U.S. 89/191/287, ½ mile north of Jackson Lake Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83013. 307/543–3100 or 800/628–9988. www.gtlc.com. $75. June–Sept.

Winter Sports

Grand Teton has some of North America's finest and most varied cross-country skiing. Ski the gentle 3-mile Swan Lake–Heron Pond Loop near Colter Bay, the mostly level 10-mile Jenny Lake Trail, or the moderate 4-mile Taggart Lake–Beaver Creek Loop and 5-mile Phelps Lake Overlook Trail. Teton Park Road is groomed for classic and skate-skiing from early January to mid-March. In winter, overnight backcountry travelers must register or make a reservation at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center.

Snowmobiling is permitted on Jackson Lake only for ice fishing. Since snowmobiles must be towed into the park, sledders pay only the regular park entrance fees. Snowmobilers wishing to proceed north from Flagg Ranch into Yellowstone National Park must be with a commercial tour guide.

The Flagg Ranch Information Station is closed in winter but ski and snowshoe trails are open and marked with flagging tape. Pick up a map at the Flagg Ranch convenience store. For information about a free, ranger-guided snowshoe walk, call the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center.

Tours and Outfitters

Pepi Stiegler Sports. Buy or rent skis or snowboards at Pepi's, conveniently located at the base of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. The array of clothing and accessories is the largest in the valley. 3395 W. Village Dr., Teton Village, WY, 83025. 307/733–4505. www.pepistieglers.com. Ski or snowboard rental $28–$52. Nov.–Apr. 3255 W. Village Dr., 83025. 307/733–6838.

Skinny Skis. The hub for nordic skiing in the valley sells and rents equipment for snowshoeing, skate-skiing, and classic cross-country skiing. It's also the place to find down jackets, wool base layers, and advice on what trails to explore. 65 W. Deloney Ave., Jackson, WY, 83001. 307/733–6094. www.skinnyskis.com. Mon.–Sat. 9–6, Sun. 10–5.

Togwotee Mountain Lodge. Rent a snowmobile and explore 600-plus miles of groomed trails and endless powder-filled meadows along the Continental Divide. 27655 Hwy. 26–287, Moran, WY, 83013. 307/543–2847 or 866/278–4245. www.togwoteelodge.com. Snowmobile rental $164–$209. Nov.–Apr.

Boating

The companies that operate in Grand Teton also generally have trips on other area waters. The Snake River outside the park has spectacular white-water stretches. The rafting season runs from late May through August, with the wildest water during June.

Golf

Jackson Hole Golf and Tennis Club. This 18-hole course redesigned by Robert Trent Jones has views of the Teton Range and an eco-friendly and elegant clubhouse. It has been ranked among Wyoming's top courses. 5000 Spring Gulch Rd., 9 miles north of Jackson on U.S. 189, then 2 miles west at Gros Ventre Junction, Grand Teton National Park, WY, 83001. 307/733–3111. www.jhgtc.com. 18 holes. 7409 yards. Par 72. Green Fee: $65–$185. Late Apr.–mid-Oct. Facilities: Driving range, putting green, pitching area, golf carts, pull carts, rental clubs, pro-shop, golf academy/lessons, restaurant, bar.

Teton Pines Resort and Country Tennis Club. Arnold Palmer and Ed Seay designed this relatively flat 18-hole course near Teton Village. It has views of the Tetons, abundant wildlife, and is certified as an Audubon course. In winter it becomes a well-groomed cross-country ski track with a full-service shop. The restaurant is excellent. 3450 N. Clubhouse Dr., Wilson, WY, 83014. 307/733–1005 or 800/238–2223. www.tetonpines.com. 18 holes. 7412 yards. 72 par. Green fee $160 after noon, $120 after 2, $85 juniors. May–mid-Oct. Facilities: driving range, putting green, pitching area, golf carts, pull carts, caddies, rental clubs, pro-shop, lessons, restaurant, bar.

Winter Sports

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. Skiers and snowboarders love Jackson Hole, one of the great skiing experiences in America on 2,500 acres. There are literally thousands of routes up and down the mountain, and not all of them are hellishly steep, despite Jackson's reputation. In the summer, a mountain-bike park takes advantage of the legendary terrain. Jackson Hole, WY, 83025. 307/733–2292 or 800/333–7766. www.jacksonhole.com.