Whether you have a favorite team or a beloved ballpark, you probably have a cherished baseball memory. Why not create some new family memories at an iconic American stadium? Some are old, some are new; most have lots of updated bells and whistles to add to the fun. Here are our picks for the best in each region, plus several more that might inspire you.

AARP MEMBER DISCOUNTS SEE MORE

Subscribe to the AARP Travel Newsletter

NORTHEAST

Fenway Park, Boston

No true fan's life is complete without a pilgrimage to Fenway Park, Major League Baseball's oldest stadium. Completed in 1912, the home of the Boston Red Sox preserves the magic of a different time: a bandbox with steel columns, eccentric field geometry and the Green Monster, a 37-foot left field wall. But Fenway offers more than old-school charm. Now you'll find improved seats (some atop the Monster), new food options, and — cover your eyes, purists — big video boards. Enjoy the visit with a cup of clam chowder, and check out Autograph Alley: exciting for the kids.

More to explore:

Look into historic Centennial Field in Burlington, Vermont. Completed in 1906 (the year Satchel Paige was born) on the University of Vermont campus, it's home to the UVM Catamounts and the Vermont Lake Monsters minor league team.

For a more modern experience, the East's best is Pittsburgh's PNC Park. Even the highest seat in the stadium is less than a hundred feet from the field. There are symbolic nods to the history of the Pirates throughout the park — the right field wall is 21 feet high, a tip of the cap to Pittsburgh's immortal No. 21, Roberto Clemente. Enjoy a local favorite: pierogi mascot races. Or rent a boat or kayak and enjoy the game on the water; you might just catch a stray ball.

If you're thinking about driving to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York, consider visiting over Memorial Day Weekend and watching the Hall of Fame Classic at Doubleday Field. It's hard to get closer to big leaguers without going to spring training.